Hayes, Joe

Hayes, Joe

Joe Hayes is one of America’s premier storytellers–a nationally recognized teller of tales from the Hispanic, Native American and Anglo cultures. His bilingual Spanish-English tellings have earned him a distinctive place among America’s storytellers. His books, CDs and tapes of Southwestern stories are popular nationwide. Born in Pennsylvania, Joe Hayes moved as a child to a small town in southern Arizona, some fifty miles from the Mexican border. From Mexican-American friends and schoolmates he began to acquire a knowledge of Spanish and an appreciation for Hispanic culture. As an adult, his experience with Spanish helped him find work doing mineral exploration in Mexico and Spain. When Joe moved to New Mexico in 1976, he first taught high school English, but his interest in the rich folklore of the region was already growing. He enjoyed sharing stories with his own children so much that he decided to shape a career for himself as a storyteller. Joe gathered traditional stories of the Southwest, added a little of his own spice and hit the road, traveling all over to share his stories. He has captured the imagination of children in schools all over the United States. In 2005, Joe received the Talking Leaves Literary Award from the National Storytelling Network, an award given to members of the storytelling community who have made considerable and influential contributions to the literature of storytelling. Joe has taught storytelling to teachers at the University of New Mexico and been a guest lecturer at many colleges and universities, delivering the commencement address for the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at U.C.L.A. He was designated a New Mexico Eminent Scholar by the New Mexico Commission on Higher Education, and in 1995 he received the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence. Joe began sharing his stories in print in 1982. His books have received many awards including the Arizona Young Readers Award, two Land of Enchantment Children’s Book Awards, and an Aesop Accolade Award. Joe’s books have also been on the Texas Bluebonnet Award Master List three times, and Ghost Fever–selected by Texas school children–won the Texas Bluebonnet Award for 2006-2007, the first bilingual book to achieve that distinction.

Read More

Hathcock, Chuck

Chuck Hathcock is a wildlife biologist in northern New Mexico with 17 years of experience in the field. Currently he works for the Department of Energy managing biological resources such as endangered species and migratory birds. He has a diverse background in wildlife biology with special emphasis on avian studies. His research interests are in avian population demographics and how avian populations are affected by impacts such as habitat fragmentation or climate change. He is looking forward to his first Family Nature Summit and highlighting his passion for conservation. When Chuck is not at his 9-5 job, he’s often at some remote place in the southwest or Mexico, usually chasing birds and exploring.

Read More

Goff, Fraser

Fraser Goff received a B.S. in chemistry from San Jose State University (1971) and his Ph.D. in Earth Science from University of California Santa Cruz (1977), where his thesis dealt with igneous petrology and geochemistry of basalt. During this period he worked at the US Geological Survey in Menlo Park, California (1969-1977) on geothermal and volcano projects. From 1978-2004 Fraser was employed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico working on a series of geothermal, volcano, and environmental projects. He was Chief Scientist and Principal Investigator on three high-temperature scientific wells in the Valles Caldera (1983-1991). He was head geochemist during drilling of four exploration wells in Central America for US AID (1985-1992). Since 2004 Fraser has been adjunct professor at University of New Mexico and New Mexico Institute of Technology, a member of the StateMap Program (NMBG&MR), and a private consultant. Fraser led or co-led long-term projects to investigate the chemical and isotopic composition of magmatic and geothermal fluids, and to develop remote sensing techniques to analyze gas compositions from active volcano plumes. He has worked on about 40 geothermal systems and 15 active volcanoes worldwide during his career and has been author or co-author on more than 100 referred journal publications. Since 2004 Fraser has been author or co-author on 15 geologic maps. In 2009 he published Valles Caldera – A Geologic History (114 p., University of New Mexico Press). Fraser is now completing a geologic map and report on Mount Taylor, New Mexico’s “other” famous volcano.

Read More

Goff, Cathy J.

Cathy J. Goff obtained her BS in Geology from San Jose State University (1983, magna cum laude). From 1978 to 2002, Cathy was employed by the US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California and became a specialist on the fluid geochemistry of geothermal and volcanic systems. From 1983 to 1990 she conducted major projects at Los Azufres and Cerro Prieto (Mexico), Klamath Falls (Oregon), Valles caldera (New Mexico), Salton Sea, Long Valley Caldera, and The Geysers-Clear Lake (California), Makushin Volcano (Alaska), Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming), geothermal systems in Guatemala, Costa Rica and Honduras, and Lassen Volcanic National Park (California). In 1986-1987, Cathy attended Stanford University under the USGS Geologic Division Graduate School Training Scholarship (competitive award). At Stanford, Cathy studied physical and fluid geochemistry of geothermal and ore-depositing systems; determine d the stable isotope properties of epidote in active and fossil hydrothermal systems; and investigated fluid-mineral equilibrium in the State 2-14 well, Salton Sea geothermal system. In 1990 she became Chief of the Chemical Processes in Geothermal Systems Project and performed several special assignments on the Kilauea Volcano geothermal system (Hawaii), the Alid geothermal system (Eritrea) and the Dixie Valley geothermal system (Nevada). From 1995 to 2002, Cathy worked on the Magmatic Volatiles and Hydrothermal Systems Project with special emphasis on the Cascades and Aleutian volcanic arcs, and a project at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico). In 2002, Cathy retired from the USGS and moved to New Mexico where she is a consultant and part-time contributor to the New Mexico StateMap Program (2003-present).

Read More

Foxx, Terry

Teralene (Terry) Foxx is an ecologist, writer, artist, and storyteller. These interests support each other in her understanding of the world around us. As a scientist, in the field of botany and ecology, she has done teaching, research and writing about plant ecology, fire ecology and conservation ecology. She worked in conservation and compliance ecology at Los Alamos National Laboratory for 20 years and is retired. Using her skill as a storyteller, she connects adults and children, in schools, churches, nature centers, with nature and what is around them. In art, she uses pencil, pen, brush, or needle and thread to document observations to express how she feels or what she sees. She has taught classes for the novice in wildflower identification, journal writing, and fire ecology at the University of New Mexico, Los Alamos, Los Alamos Nature Center, and Ghost Ranch. Beginning in 1975, she began a long-term study on fire in the ecosystems of Bandelier National Monument. She personally has experienced wildfire, evacuation, and the recovery of the landscape and the community of Los Alamos during and after the Cerro Grande fire.

Presently, she is writing a book on the Plants of the Jemez Mountains with Craig Martin of Los Alamos. This is a revision of a previous book published in the 1980s with Dorothy Hoard. She is the author of a number of professional publications and a children’s book with her daughter Alison Carlisi, called “The Forest and the Fire” published by the Los Alamos Historical Society. For more information see her website www.teralenefoxx.com

Read More

Cary, Steve

Born and raised in the Upper Midwest, Steve Cary earned his M.S. at the University of Wisconsin. After a 30-year career in environmental protection and natural resource management for the State of New Mexico, Steve worked for almost 5 years in various capacities for Audubon New Mexico. Butterflies have always been Steve’s passion and he has published a variety scientific and popular articles on these amazing creatures. Through countless public talks and guided walks, he has become New Mexico’s Butterfly Guy. His wonderful book, Butterfly Landscapes of New Mexico, was published in 2009. He continues to pursue his passions for butterflies, native pollinators and natural history through travel, writing, research and public presentations.

Read More

Bruggeman, David Alan

David Alan Bruggeman: I have been a meteorologist with Los Alamos National Laboratory since 2014. I received a bachelor’s degree in Earth Science from Minnesota State University of Mankato and a bachelor’s degree in Meteorology from Metropolitan State University of Denver. I received my master’s in Meteorology from San Jose State University with my thesis focusing on dust transport on Mars. I have taught introductory weather classes, forecast for the Denver Broncos, and was an intern with the National Weather Service, NASA, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Read More

Barber, Ron

Ron Barber was born and raised in the oil fields of South America, in small isolated backcountry oil camps. His parents hauled their kids though the mountains, deserts and jungles; always in search of new adventures. Encountering indigenous cultures and ancient sites has led to a long-term interest and curiosity about lost civilizations. Ron is an explorer by nature, an engineer by profession. He’s a mechanical engineer with over 35 years at the national laboratories in California and New Mexico. Over the last 7 years he has formed a project to study rock art throughout the southwest, specifically looking for glyphs that might provide insights into early astronomical knowledge. He has applied his engineering background to develop a systematic approach to surveying and identifying glyphs for potential study, as well as developing 3 dimensional modeling of light and sum interactions.

Read More

Tufts, Jean

Jean Tufts has enjoyed the Family Summit experience for many years as an instructor of adult programs and as a participant. She is very excited to be returning again this year to be involved in the Jr. Naturalist program. Jean has taught environmental education to students at her local elementary school as well as led many field trips for kids to learn about the environment. Jean lives in a rural town in Vermont with her dog, Fielder.

Read More

Williams, Tom

Tom Williams: Our family has been coming to the summits for 16 years. The kids are grown now but every year shared a special experience with their peers – and they still enjoy coming now as young adults. I’ve enjoyed all activities and friendships made at the summits, especially volunteering for various jobs. We live and grew up in Indiana. I am semi-retired from an Indiana utility as a systems/business analyst and technical writer.

Read More